USC Price School of Public Policy

Event Details

Interview Day

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John Stauffer Pharmaceutical Sciences Center (PSC) (Map)

Meet prospective employees at the USC School of Pharmacy, the nation's pioneer in expanding the scope and impact of pharmacy education and practice.

 

Schedule

8AM: Check-in

9AM-12PM: Interviews

12-1PM: Lunch/Networking

1-3PM: Interviews

 

RSVP at usc.edu/esvp using code: 102117

 

$250 fee includes parking, continental breakfast, and lunch for up to four company representatives.

 

For more information please contact Cheryl Stanovich at stanovic@usc.edu

Early Modern British History with Susannah Ottaway

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Huntington Library (Map)
Seaver 1-2

"A 'Failure Ludicrous in Its Completeness'? Putting the Right Spin on the Workhouse"

Workhouses were a major innovation in social welfare practice and policy in eighteenth-century England, with over 3000 parishes utilizing this institutional mode of poor relief by the end of the century.  Seldom deeply analyzed by historians, workhouses lurk in popular memory as heinous "Pauper Bastilles," but recent research has highlighted the high levels of care they provided for inmates. Using both traditional social history methods and digital reconstruction techniques, "The Workhouse Dickens Never Saw" seeks to recreate the lived experience of paupers in the eighteenth-century workhouse, while exploring the changes in policy and ideology that underpinned the rise of poor law institutions in the age of Enlightenment. 

Susannah Ottaway is Professor of History at Carleton College, where she teaches courses in early modern European and nineteenth-century British and Irish history.  Her publications include The Decline of Life: Old Age in Eighteenth-Century England (Cambridge, 2004), and an 8-volume set of primary sources co-edited with Lynn Botelho Old Age in England 1500-1800 (London, 2008, 2009).  A major focus of her work has been the public humanities in Minnesota; she serves on the Board of Directors of the MN Humanities Center, and is co-directing a four-year Mellon-funded grant called "Public Works: Connecting Communities to the Arts and Humanities at Carleton."

 

Early Modern British History with Susannah Ottaway (USC EMSI)

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The Huntington Library (Map)
Seaver Rooms 1-2

"A 'Failure Ludicrous in Its Completeness'? Putting the Right Spin on the Workhouse"

 

Workhouses were a major innovation in social welfare practice and policy in eighteenth-century England, with over 3000 parishes utilizing this institutional mode of poor relief by the end of the century.  Seldom deeply analyzed by historians, workhouses lurk in popular memory as heinous "Pauper Bastilles," but recent research has highlighted the high levels of care they provided for inmates. Using both traditional social history methods and digital reconstruction techniques, "The Workhouse Dickens Never Saw" seeks to recreate the lived experience of paupers in the eighteenth-century workhouse, while exploring the changes in policy and ideology that underpinned the rise of poor law institutions in the age of Enlightenment. 

 

Susannah Ottaway is Professor of History at Carleton College, where she teaches courses in early modern European and nineteenth-century British and Irish history.  Her publications include The Decline of Life: Old Age in Eighteenth-Century England(Cambridge, 2004), and an 8-volume set of primary sources co-edited with Lynn Botelho Old Age in England 1500-1800 (London, 2008, 2009).  A major focus of her work has been the public humanities in Minnesota; she serves on the Board of Directors of the MN Humanities Center, and is co-directing a four-year Mellon-funded grant called "Public Works: Connecting Communities to the Arts and Humanities at Carleton."

The Met in HD: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s Die Zauberflöte (The Magic Flute)

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Norris Cinema Theatre (NCT) (Map)

The Met in HD: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s Die Zauberflöte (The Magic Flute)
12 p.m.: Pre-Opera Discussion
1 p.m.: HD Opera Broadcast

ADMISSION:
Admission is free. Reservations required. RSVP at cinema.usc.edu/TheMagicFlute beginning Monday, October 2, at 12 p.m.

DESCRIPTION:
The USC School of Cinematic Arts will host a series of satellite broadcasts from the Metropolitan Opera presented in spectacular HD digital projection and 5.1 surround sound.

Following a pre-opera discussion hosted by Ken Cazan, chair of vocal arts and opera/resident stage director at the USC Thornton School of Music, we will present a delayed satellite broadcast of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s Die Zauberflöte (The Magic Flute). Met Music Director Emeritus James Levine conducts Tony Award winner Julie Taymor’s production of Mozart’s masterpiece, with Golda Schultz making her Met debut as Pamina, Kathryn Lewek as the Queen of the Night, Charles Castronovo as the fairy-tale prince Tamino, Markus Werba as the bird-catching Papageno, Christian Van Horn as Sprecher, and René Pape as Sarastro.

Opera running time: 3 hours, 9 minutes. In German, with English subtitles.

Additional Links:
Metropolitan Opera Facebook, Instagram, Tumblr, Twitter, YouTube
Die Zauberflöte (The Magic Flute) Metropolitan Opera page
James Levine The New Yorker feature
Julie Taymor IMDb, TED.com profile
Golda Schultz Facebook, Twitter
Kathryn Lewek Facebook, Twitter
Charles Castronovo Wikipedia
Markus Werba Facebook
Christian Van Horn Facebook, Twitter, Wikipedia
Rene Pape Facebook

Presented by USC Visions and Voices: The Arts and Humanities Initiative. Organized by the USC School of Cinematic Arts in conjunction with the USC Thornton School of Music and the Metropolitan Opera.

Photo: Ken Howard/Metropolitan Opera

The Met in HD: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s Die Zauberflöte (The Magic Flute)

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Norris Cinema Theatre (NCT) (Map)

The USC School of Cinematic Arts presents a delayed satellite broadcast from the Met as Music Director Emeritus James Levine conducts Tony Award winner Julie Taymor’s production of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s masterpiece, Die Zauberflöte (The Magic Flute). Golda Schultz makes her Met debut as Pamina, Kathryn Lewek performs as the Queen of the Night, Charles Castronovo as the fairy-tale prince Tamino, Markus Werba as the bird-catching Papageno, Christian Van Horn as Sprecher, and René Pape as Sarastro. Ken Cazan, chair of vocal arts and opera/resident stage director at the USC Thornton School of Music presents a pre-opera discussion.

Opera running time: 3 hours, 9 minutes. In German, with English subtitles.

Presented by USC Visions and Voices: The Arts and Humanities Initiative.

Men's Water Polo vs. UC Irvine

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(Map)

USC School of Dramatic Arts Presents: PASSION PLAY

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Scene Dock Theatre (SCD) (Map)

Three different acting troupes rehearse the annual Passion Play at three key moments in history: 1575 Northern England, just before Queen Elizabeth outlaws the ritual; 1934 Oberammergau, Bavaria, as Adolf Hitler is rising to power; and Spearfish, South Dakota, from the time of the Vietnam War through Ronald Reagan’s presidency. In each period, the players grapple with the transformative nature of art, and politics are never far in the background. Hailed by The New Yorker’s John Lahr as “extraordinary,” “bold,” and “inventive,” and called “a new American classic” by Time Magazine, this intimate epic occurs at the timely intersection of politics and religion.

Discounted parking is available for $10. Please inform the gate officer you are attending a School of Dramatic Arts performance.

USC School of Dramatic Arts presents: PUNK ROCK

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Scene Dock Theatre (SCD) (Map)

In a private school outside of Manchester, England, a group of highly-articulate 17-year-olds flirt and posture their way through the day while preparing for their A-Level mock exams. With hormones raging and minimal adult supervision, the students must prepare for their future — and survive the savagery of high school. Inspired by playwright Simon Stephens’ experience as a teacher, Punk Rock exposes the corrupt heart of adolescence in a hilarious and chilling narrative. “[A] tender, ferocious and frightening play…Mr. Stephens, one of the most quietly original playwrights working today.” – The New York Times

Discounted parking is available for $10. Please inform the gate officer you are attending a School of Dramatic Arts performance.

Cardinal & Gold: Succulents

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McCarthy MPR 1100 (Map)

Join Residential Education for our upcoming Cardinal & Gold event and go home with your own succulent! Come with your friends over to McCarthy MPR 1100. This is located in the corner of McCarthy closest to Jefferson and McClintock . This will be an opportunity for you to chose a succulent to brighten your room, paint the container you put your succulent in, and enjoy some refreshments. See you October 21st at 9pm!