USC Price School of Public Policy

Executive Master of Urban Planning Courses

DTLA

Economics of a Productive Development, 3 units

An introduction to the economic and financial aspects of real estate development, structured to be relevant to a broad range of urban professionals. Basic tools, including financial analysis, cost of capital, and methods of financial analysis will be introduced. Additionally, students will learn methods to evaluate combinations of financing, including across the public and private sectors, and theoretical and institutional issues inherent in such financial arrangements.

Politics and Processes of Urban Development, 2 units

Planning and development necessarily exist within a complex political landscape. This is the first of a two-course sequence that will introduce concepts of formal and informal political institutions, with a focus on neighborhood level and informal community or advocacy organizations. This course will cover urban policy across different levels of government (local, state, national), global political trends, and common political tensions related to growth and development, including pro-growth and anti-growth movements.

Urban Political Economy and Urban Development, 2 units

Planning and development necessarily exist within a complex political landscape. This is the second of a two-course sequence that will introduce concepts of formal and informal political institutions, with a focus on neighborhood level and informal community or advocacy organizations. This course will cover budgetary and fiscal politics, metropolitan fragmentation and suburbanization, immigration, and race, gender and ethnicity in urban politics. The course will focus on implications for planning and development.

Economics for a Productive City, 3 units

The basic concepts of urban and land economics are introduced with an explicit focus on how planning and development are shaped by the metropolitan economic context and how key theoretical elements inform planning and development questions, with a focus on neighborhood levels of geography and how theory suggests that the neighborhood links to and is influenced by the broader metropolitan economic context. Topics include externalities and public goods, financing infrastructure related to development, and ways that industrial structure, the arts, and cultural resources relate to economic development.

Planning and Development Case Study, 1 unit

This course will be half of a four-day in-person intensive. Following on the instruction in “Economics of a Productive Development,” students will analyze a project and develop recommendations for financing and regulatory issues.

Designing Livable Environments I, 1 unit

This course will be half of a four-day in-person intensive. Students will work in a studio setting, going through a design charrette, visiting a site, and developing an understanding of design principles.

Effective Engagement with Stakeholders, 3 units

This course will immerse students in modes and approaches to engaging community residents, gaining their trust, and developing sustainable methods of input and connection. This will include instruction in more traditional approaches, such as focus groups and charrettes, with their strengths and weaknesses, especially applied to marginalized populations. The course will also include instruction in social media, open government and the role of information technologies, and other more recent trends, with special emphases on ensuring the continuation of trust and maintaining the community’s voice.

Big Data for Planning and Development, 2 units

This course is designed for leaders and managers, providing an introduction to data and visualization trends as they relate to urban planning and development. The goal will be to train leaders to manage teams and leverage data and information technology resources. Topics covered will include geographic information systems, smart phone technologies and applications, social media, sensor data (e.g. “the internet of things”), and visualization. Instruction will focus on trends, skills that managers should seek when hiring and building teams, and the relationship to planning and development.

Designing Livable Environments II, 1 unit

This course will be half of a four-day in-person intensive. This is a second part of a two-part sequence. Students will build on concepts learned in “Designing Livable Environments 1,” and work in a studio setting, going through a design charrette, visiting a site, and developing an understanding of design principles.

Communicating Data for Planning and Development, 1 units

This course will be half of a four-day in-person intensive. Instruction in data presentation and visualization methods will build on concepts introduced in the “Big Data” course.

Leading a Collaborative City, 4 units

This course will focus on a set of leadership skills tailored to a cross-sectoral group of professionals in planning and development. Topics will include insights into cross-sectoral collaboration, negotiation, and theories of organizational leadership. Instruction will focus on collaborative approaches necessary to bridging the needs of stakeholders in the public, private, and non-profit sectors. As a secondary objective, the course will introduce metrics for performance assessment, project management, methods of writing requests for proposals and responding to such requests, and team building within and across organizations.

Integrating Concepts for Action, 1 units

Students will be divided into teams to work on a capstone project that will integrate the learning. Students will be briefed about the projects and will organize (or be organized) into teams with objectives and work plans that they develop.