USC Price School of Public Policy

Event Details

Somerville Place Move - In Day

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Fluor Tower (FLT) (Map)
5th Floor

The Center for Black Cultural and Student Affairs (CBCSA) welcomes its newest cohort of #SomervilleScholars.  With light breakfast and lunch provided, incoming students to the floor will meet current faculty, staff, and students while getting ready for the SUITE life!

"Multi-Scale Imaging of Neuronal Synapses and Circuits” by Dr. Guoqiang Bi

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Zilkha Neurogenetic Institute (ZNI) (Map)
Herklotz Seminar Room 112

Zilkha Seminar Series

To understand brain function it is desirable to visualize its multiple structures, from the synapse that operates as the basic unit of information processing and storage to the network of neuronal circuits across the whole brain.  In this talk, Dr. Bi will share his recent work in the development and application of new imaging techniques, including cryo-electron tomography and correlative light-electron microscopy techniques for the study of synapses, as well as an ultra-high speed optical microscopy method for whole brain mapping.

 

Guoqiang Bi PhD
Xinchuang Professor and Changjjang Scholar
School of Life Sciences
University of Science and Technology of China
Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale

Western Histories in the Making: Graduate Student Presentations

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Doheny Memorial Library (DML) (Map)
240

Please join ICW and CCI at a brown-bag lunch of Western Histories in the Making. Three graduate students will present their work and their research paths to continue fostering a connection between ICW and Doheny Library. All are welcome.

 

Jordan Keagle (@jkeagle)

Harvesting Winter – The Natural Ice Trade in the American West

Jordan Keagle's research ties together two broad narratives, the “conquering” of the Western environment and the rise of capitalism, by examining a curious commodity: ice. Specifically, his work reconstructs the natural ice industry in the Pacific West in the nineteenth century. In his presentation, Keagle will argue that ice was itself a critical raw material in the building of the West—one that has been so far overlooked despite its interconnection with other industries and products. His paper illustrates the opportunities the ice trade offered consumers and the lengths to which Westerners went to obtain a measure of control over their environment.

Yesenia Navarette Hunter (@yeshunter)

Go After the Boys: The Spanish American Institute and Ethnic Boundary-Making in Early Twentieth Century California

Religious-based Americanization projects helped create the boundaries of an ethnic identity based on Anglo-Protestantism in early twentieth century American history. Although Americanization projects have largely been seen as imposed on communities of color Navarette Hunter's paper will show how Mexican families engaged in the process of ethnic boundary-making when sending their boys to the Methodist-run Spanish American Institute, a boarding school for Mexican boys, in Gardena, California. By looking at parental engagement in records archived at The Huntington Library, alongside publications produced by the boys at the institute archived at Doheny Library, this paper shows the dynamic process of identity and boundary-making and the social landscape on which it took shape.

Daniel Wallace (@therealtalice)

Omaha Affairs: Prostitutes, Railroads, and Divorce in Progressive Era Omaha

When Mary McKeen remarried, she perhaps thought the only reminder of her ex-husband would be the regular alimony payments he was expected to make. But in 1912, Omaha coal magnate Charles Hull sued McKeen and her new husband, William R. McKeen, Jr., in an attempt to get out of paying the $91,000 (over $2 million today) he owed to her. What Hull apparently failed to predict was the counter strategy that the McKeens would employ in attempts to expose Hull’s infidelity and promiscuous behavior. The McKeens’ lawyers began interviewing a who’s who of Omaha movers and shakers, including powerful businessmen, country club employees, and the gamblers and prostitutes of Omaha’s notorious Third Ward. Daniel Wallace’s project analyzes this high-drama story and its implications regarding divorce, prostitution, race, and class in 1912 Omaha.

 

This event is open to any who wish to attend so please feel free to bring your own lunch and join us. Presented by the Huntington-USC Institute on California and the West (ICW) and USC Libraries Collections Convergence Initiative (CCI).

Western Histories in the Making: Graduate Student Presentations (USC ICW)

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Doheny Memorial Library (DML) (Map)
240

Wednesday, August 15, 2018

12:00-1:30pm

USC Doheny Memorial Library 240

 

Jordan Keagle (@jkeagle)

Harvesting Winter – The Natural Ice Trade in the American West

Jordan Keagle's research ties together two broad narratives, the “conquering” of the Western environment and the rise of capitalism, by examining a curious commodity: ice. Specifically, his work reconstructs the natural ice industry in the Pacific West in the nineteenth century. In his presentation, Keagle will argue that ice was itself a critical raw material in the building of the West—one that has been so far overlooked despite its interconnection with other industries and products. His paper illustrates the opportunities the ice trade offered consumers and the lengths to which Westerners went to obtain a measure of control over their environment.

Yesenia Navarette Hunter (@yeshunter)

Go After the Boys: The Spanish American Institute and Ethnic Boundary-Making in Early Twentieth Century California

Religious-based Americanization projects helped create the boundaries of an ethnic identity based on Anglo-Protestantism in early twentieth century American history. Although Americanization projects have largely been seen as imposed on communities of color Navarette Hunter's paper will show how Mexican families engaged in the process of ethnic boundary-making when sending their boys to the Methodist-run Spanish American Institute, a boarding school for Mexican boys, in Gardena, California. By looking at parental engagement in records archived at The Huntington Library, alongside publications produced by the boys at the institute archived at Doheny Library, this paper shows the dynamic process of identity and boundary-making and the social landscape on which it took shape.

Daniel Wallace (@therealtalice)

Omaha Affairs: Prostitutes, Railroads, and Divorce in Progressive Era Omaha

When Mary McKeen remarried, she perhaps thought the only reminder of her ex-husband would be the regular alimony payments he was expected to make. But in 1912, Omaha coal magnate Charles Hull sued McKeen and her new husband, William R. McKeen, Jr., in an attempt to get out of paying the $91,000 (over $2 million today) he owed to her. What Hull apparently failed to predict was the counter strategy that the McKeens would employ in attempts to expose Hull’s infidelity and promiscuous behavior. The McKeens’ lawyers began interviewing a who’s who of Omaha movers and shakers, including powerful businessmen, country club employees, and the gamblers and prostitutes of Omaha’s notorious Third Ward. Daniel Wallace’s project analyzes this high-drama story and its implications regarding divorce, prostitution, race, and class in 1912 Omaha.

 

This event is open to any who wish to attend so please feel free to bring your own lunch and join us. Presented by the Huntington-USC Institute on California and the West (ICW) and USC Libraries Collections Convergence Initiative (CCI).

ZOOM! Meet an Air Force Fighter Pilot!

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Grace Ford Salvatori Hall (GFS) (Map)
106

Come meet a fellow student and United States Air Force Captain, who will present flying & aviation career opportunities for USC students! He will speak from his experience as a current F-15E fighter jet aviator and supervisor for the Air Force ROTC program at USC, and answer any questions on the timeline for students interested in pursuing a career in military aviation. All majors are invited, all students are invited! Co-hosted by the Veterans at Price student organization.

Lisa Locascio: OPEN ME

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Skylight Books (Map)

 LISA LOCASCIO discusses her debut novel OPEN ME with KAROLINA WACLAWIAK

A political and erotically-charged debut that follows a young American woman’s transformative journey during one pivotal summer abroad hailed by Viet Thanh Nguyen as “unflinching in its portrayal of sex, desire, racism, and the excitement and confusion of youth.”

​Roxana Olsen has always dreamed of going to Paris, and after high school graduation finally plans to travel there on a study abroad program—a welcome reprieve from the bruising fallout of her parents’ divorce. But a logistical mix-up brings Roxana to Copenhagen instead, where she’s picked up at the airport by Søren, a twenty-eight year old guide who is meant to be her steward. Instantly drawn to one another, Roxana and Søren’s relationship turns romantic, and when he asks Roxana to accompany him to a small town in the north of Denmark for the rest of the summer, she doesn’t hesitate to accept. There, Roxana’s world narrows and opens as she experiences fantasy, ritual, and the pleasures of her body, a thrilling realm of erotic and domestic bliss. But as their relationship deepens, Søren’s temperament darkens, and Roxana finds herself increasingly drawn to a mysterious local outsider whom she learns is a refugee from the Balkan War.

An erotic coming-of-age like no other, from a magnetic new voice in fiction, Open Me is a daringly original and darkly compelling portrait of a young woman discovering her power, her sex, and her voice; and an incisive examination of xenophobia, migration, and what it means to belong.

Outside the Box [Office]: Summer 2018

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(Map)

Outside the Box [Office] is SCA's ongoing weekly showcase for upcoming international, documentary and independent cinema. The series draws from around the globe to present movies that may challenge, inspire or simply entertain and often features recent award-winning films from Sundance, Cannes, Berlin, SXSW and Venice Film Festivals. All screenings are free of charge and open to the public, unless otherwise noted. All screenings will be OVERBOOKED to ensure capacity.

Click on individual film titles below for a website specific to that screening, including synopsis, trailer, running time, rating and artwork, as well as to MAKE RESERVATIONS.

SCHEDULE OF SCREENINGS

06/11: Damsel, 7:00PM, Ray Stark Family Theatre, SCA 108

06/13: The Yellow Birds, 7:00PM, Ray Stark Family Theatre, SCA 108

06/19: The Catcher Was a Spy, 7:00PM, Ray Stark Family Theatre, SCA 108

06/25: Sicario: Day of the Soldado, 7:00PM, Ray Stark Family Theatre, SCA 108

06/26: Under the Tree, 7:00PM, Ray Stark Family Theatre, SCA 108

07/09: A Midsummer Night's Dream, 7:00PM, Ray Stark Family Theatre, SCA 108

07/11: Eighth Grade, 7:00PM, Ray Stark Family Theatre, SCA 108

07/12: Skyscraper, 7:30PM, Norris Cinema Theatre, NCT

07/25: A Syrian Love Story, 7:00PM, Ray Stark Family Theatre, SCA 108

07/26: The Other Side of Hope, 7:00PM, Ray Stark Family Theatre, SCA 108

08/01: Nico, 1988, 7:00PM, Ray Stark Family Theatre, SCA 108

08/08: The Wife, 7:00PM, Ray Stark Family Theatre, SCA 108

08/15: Crazy Rich Asians, 7:30PM, Norris Cinema Theatre, NCT

CONTACT INFORMATION

Name: Alessandro Ago
Email: aago@cinema.usc.edu