Event Details

Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Awareness Week

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UPC and HSC Campuses (Map)

A week-long series of workshops, research presentations, events and social gatherings that help build your “toolkit” for bringing equity and inclusivity into the classroom, the workplace, hallway conversations, and everywhere else in our lives. Join colleagues and classmates in discussing challenging questions and working toward better solutions.

View all the events for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Awareness Week. 

 

From the Battle in France to the Liberation of Germany: Letters and Artifacts from the Harry K. Wolff Jr. Collection

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Doheny Memorial Library (DML) (Map)
Treasure Room

Among the hundreds of thousands of US soldiers called to duty during WWII was a thirty-year-old Jewish lawyer from San Francisco named Harry K. Wolff Jr. His army unit landed in France around D-Day in June 1944 and fought its way to Germany over the next year. Postwar, Wolff acted as a judge advocate for American soldiers and witnessed war crime tribunals at the former concentration camp in Dachau, where he was one of the officers responsible for 30,000 Nazi soldiers housed while awaiting trial.

Wolff wrote letters home describing his experiences abroad—including basic training, deployment in combat, and his time at Dachau and the subsequent trials—as well as the “souvenirs” he picked up along the way. Unusual for most US soldiers who brought home memorabilia, he wrote detailed descriptions of where and when he found a particular piece, often taking pictures of the locations.

Among the artifacts he collected are foreign brochures, pamphlets, and periodicals; copies of the Stars and Stripes newspaper produced by the US military; Nazi armbands, flags, medals, weapons and, notably, fragments from a giant swastika formerly perched atop the Nazi party rally stadium in Nuremberg but blown up by his own air defense unit on orders of General Patton.

In 2016, Wolff’s daughter, Andrea Stanley, and her husband David, donated their incredible collection of hundreds of letters, photos, and artifacts to USC, where it joins a growing wealth of Holocaust and other genocide-related material, including the testimonies in the USC Shoah Foundation’s Visual History Archive; the USC Libraries’ Holocaust and Genocide Studies Collection of primary and secondary sources; and the Feuchtwanger Memorial Library, home of the archives of European exiles who fled the Third Reich and settled in California.

‘Rainbow’ is the New Black: A 101 Inclusive Guide to the ABCs of Gender and Sexuality for all Bodies

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Online (Map)

Hosted by Shane'a Thomas, Senior Lecturer, USC Suzanne Dworak-Peck School of Social Work

With the increasing presence and visibility of LGBTQI folks in society, this workshop will provide and support a safe space for a challenging and enlightening discussion that addresses the intersections of gender, sex and sexual orientation. The participants will leave with terminology and strategies in order to become better advocates.

Classroom Dial-In Information: 
Dial-in: 1-888-512-3146
Participant Code: 67735669
Then press 995794#
https://mswatusc.adobeconnect.com/r7bepn9095s/

Location: Online

Open to: Faculty, Staff, Students, Alumni

Capacity: 30

4th Homeless Service Professionals Job Fair of Los Angeles

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L.A. Southwest College (Map)
Fitness & Wellness Center)

Join us at our hiring fair and learn about the incredible impact you can have helping those living on our streets get all the support they need to start a new chapter.

We will have 30+ employers in attendance, who are looking to fill hundreds of positions in the homeless services field throughout the greater L.A. area — everything from case managers and outreach workers to housing navigators, supervisors and executives.

Resources available:

  • Resume review and editing
  • Interviewing preparation and tips
  • Connections to more local services

Homeless Service Professionals Job Fair of Los Angeles

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Los Angeles Valley College (Map)
Campus Center's Monarch Hall

Mayor Eric Garcetti, the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority, the County of Los Angeles Homeless Initiative, United Way of Greater Los Angeles and City, and County Workforce Development Systems invite you to the third annual Homeless Service Professionals Job Fair.

There will be 30+ employers in attendance, who are looking to fill hundreds of positions throughout the greater L.A. area — everything from case managers and outreach workers to housing navigators, supervisors and executives.

Come learn about the incredible impact you can have to help people get all the support they need to start a new chapter. You can help change lives.


For additional information or to register for the event, please visit  https://www.eventbrite.com/e/homeless-service-professionals-job-fair-of-los-angeles-tickets-49138365173#

Identifying and Supporting Gifted Students with Learning Disabilities

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Von KleinSmid Center (VKC) (Map)

Hosted by Rebecca Gotlieb, PhD Candidate, USC Rossier School of Education.

Twice exceptional (2E) students—students with exceptional talents and exceptional learning differences—have been understudied and underserved. This session will draw on research and personal narratives to review challenges associated with identifying 2E students, discuss ways to support 2E students, and call for individualized, supportive education.

Location: VKC 300

Open to: Faculty, staff and students

Capacity: 15

What Journalism Can Teach Us About Diversity: How to Use Our Privilege to Empower Others and Confront Injustice

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Taper Hall (THH) (Map)
420

An age-old notion holds that being “objective” means putting our personal identities aside, but as newsrooms strive to cover anincreasingly diverse America, a new generation of journalists is embracing the idea that acknowledging our differences actually helps us fulfill our credo: “to comfort the afflicted and afflict the comfortable.”

What Journalism Can Teach Us About Diversity: How to Use Our Privilege to Empower Others and Confront Injustice

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Taper Hall (THH) (Map)

Hosted by Channing Joseph, Adjunct Professor, USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism

Tradition holds that being an “objective” journalist means putting one's personal identity aside. But as newsrooms strive to cover an increasingly diverse America, a new generation of journalists is embracing the idea that acknowledging our differences actually helps us fulfill our credo: “to comfort the afflicted and afflict the comfortable.”

Location: THH 420

Open to: Faculty, Staff, Students

Capacity: 30

CER: The State of Women in Academic Medicine - Career Flexibility as a Strategic Tool

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(Map)

Amparo Villablanca, Director and Founder, UC Davis Women’s Cardiovascular Medicine Program

Amparo Villablanca will showcase accomplishments of women in medicine and highlight national data of women entering academic medicine in leadership roles, including history, national data and tools to help open the door of communication on this topic. Participants will have a better understanding of the national representation of women in academic medicine, mentorship, sponsorship and support for advancement of someone who has untapped leadership potential.

Audience: Faculty & Postdocs
January 17, 2019 | 11 – 12 PM | HSC NTT 7409
January 18, 2019 | 12 – 1 PM | CHLA Saban Research Building Auditorium

REGISTRATION REQUIRED: http://bit.ly/CERSpring2019UC

Creating a Culture of Affirmative Consent

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Montgomery Ross Fisher (MRF) (Map)

Hosted by Renee Smith-Maddox, Anita Dashiell-Sparks, Melissa Singh, Motoko Maegawa, and Loren Moye.

Sponsored by the Office of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion, USC Suzanne Dworak-Peck School of Social Work.

Recent advances in diversity education stress the importance of creating healthy conversations around sexuality and sexual interaction to avoid the risk of sexual harassment and assault. Leading theorists agree that the key intervention is to shift from the prevailing sexual assault paradigm of “No means No” to one that educates people about the importance of securing consent. This session explores communication strategies that will be effective with faculty, staff, and students as well as the challenges of transitioning to a sexual education approach focused on securing full sexual consent from partners. Based on the National SEED Project’s methodology, it is designed to equipped us with the skills to acknowledge systems of oppression, power, and privilege.

Lunch provided.

Open to: Faculty, staff and students

Capacity: 36